All Eyes on Pink Eye: NBC Sportscaster has World Talking about Conjunctivitis

Hockey rink ankle fractures and knee injuries from the ski slopes often take Olympic center stage at this time, but in Sochi all eyes have been focused on pink eye. The eye condition sidelined NBC sportscaster Bob Costas for a few Olympic broadcasts and set the world talking about conjunctivitis – the medical term for what is commonly known as  “pink eye.”

Viewers first noticed something amiss on Monday night when the left eye of Costas appeared more puffy, red and slightly less open than the right one. Even with an attempt to hide the condition behind thick-rimmed glasses, viewers knew something was up. By Tuesday, Costas had stepped aside to give the Olympic reporting reigns to broadcast colleague Matt Lauer.

CBS, ABC, NY Daily News, Yahoo Sports, Fox Sports and even Jimmy Fallon’s Tonight’s Show, as well as others have made Costas and this common childhood, and less often adult, eye condition a prime time Winter Olympic topic.

What is Pinkeye?

Highly contagious, pinkeye or conjunctivitis is caused by one of four conditions:

  1. Virus or bacterial infections
  2. Dry eyes from lack of moisture or overexposure to sun
  3. Chemical conjunctivitis from chemicals, fumes or smoke
  4. Allergies

Only the viral or bacterial condition would be considered extremely contagious.

Urgent Pinkeye Care Needed

If you suspect pink eye, it’s important to seek a medical evaluation to ensure you indeed have pink eye and not an eye condition that could be much more serious. According to The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), when symptoms do not improve, a health care provider will provide an antibiotic or other medical treatment. To get a quick evaluation and pink eye treatment in South Florida without an appointment, stop by any MD Now Urgent Care location. Our doctors will also advise you to wash your hands often and avoid direct contact with others to prevent the spread of the infection.

Nothing can put a crimp in a morning routine like having a child walk in with a crusted, swollen eye with a clear or slightly thick white drainage. If you find yourself in this situation, remember MD Now Urgent Care centers are ready to treat this condition from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., seven days a week and even on holidays. Check www.mymdnow.com for a location near you. No insurance? No problem. You can get $20 off your next self-pay MD Now Urgent Care visit with this coupon.